Articles by Clarice Honeywell

Preparing Your Child for Future Success

Posted by on Jul 21, 2012 in Articles by Clarice Honeywell | Comments Off on Preparing Your Child for Future Success

My Child is Really Struggling In School…Could It Be A Learning Disability: Preparing Your Child for Future Success When you find that a child is doing poorly in school, there may be many reasons to explain this difficulty. One conclusion that teachers and parents often assume is that the child is not trying hard enough or is neglecting their academic responsibilities. Although this may be the case at times, often there are other explanations, including social/emotional factors that are making it difficult for the child to succeed or even a medical condition that can contribute to academic problems. It is also important to determine whether or not the child has had...

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The Diagnosis and Treatment of Attention Deficit Disorder

Posted by on Jul 20, 2012 in Articles by Clarice Honeywell | Comments Off on The Diagnosis and Treatment of Attention Deficit Disorder

“The Diagnosis and Treatment of Attention Deficit Disorders” by Licensed School Psychologist, Clarice L. Honeywell, M.S., N.C.S.P.   When a student is not doing well in school, especially if teachers also report that the student doesn’t seem to concentrate in class and complete assignments, the parents may wonder if the student has an Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). It is important for parents to recognize the symptoms of an Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and then work with the proper professionals in making this diagnosis.  ADHD is a disruptive behavior disorder characterized by levels of...

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Enhancing Your Child’s Self Esteem

Posted by on Jul 20, 2012 in Articles by Clarice Honeywell | Comments Off on Enhancing Your Child’s Self Esteem

Enhancing Your Child’s Self-Esteem  A child’s knowledge about themselves often includes ideas such as “creative”, “artistic”, “tall”, “short”, etc. These ideas make up a child’s self-concept – “Who I am.” An important component of self-concept is self-esteem, which represents how we feel about or value ourselves. Self-esteem is important because poor self-esteem has been associated with low achievement, depression, drug abuse, susceptibility to peer pressure and delinquency. Although causal links between self-esteem and these problems are difficult to establish, many researchers believe that self-esteem appears to be a necessary (although not...

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